SUB-ADULT EYREFIELD MALES

 

December 2013

NOMADIC MALES: 2
(0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of either of these male lions in December.


November 2013

NOMADIC MALES: 2
(0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of either of these male lions in November.


October 2013

NOMADIC MALES: 2
(0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of either of these male lions in October.


September 2013

NOMADIC MALES: 2
(0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of either of these male lions in September.


August 2013

NOMADIC MALES: 2
(0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of either of these male lions in August.


July 2013

NOMADIC MALES: 2
(0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of either of these male lions in July.


June 2013

NOMADIC MALES
(0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of either of these male lions in June.


May 2013

NOMADIC MALES
(0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of the Eyrefield and Marthly male lions during May.


April 2013

NOMADIC MALES
(2 sighting)

The young males from the Eyrefield were seen twice. They were found on a kudu kill to the south of Beaumont’s Camp. The males remained in the area of the kill for two days. This sighting took place at the beginning of the month. Since then, there have been no confirmed sightings of them.

The month’s reports indicate that the two males have frequently been seen to the south of our boundary and have mated with Selati pride.


March 2013

NOMADIC MALES
(0 sighting)

Although there were no confirmed sightings of these two males for the month, they have been very active south of our boundary. There are attempting to overthrow the Kruger male lion. By doing this, they will earn his territory and should be able to take over the Selati Pride.


February 2013

NOMADIC MALES
(1 sighting)

There is no doubt that these males are coming of age and looking for territory of their own. They have been spending time in the western sector, asserting dominance and preying on large game. Reports suggest that on one occasion they ventured south, potentially seeking out the Selati pride. A showdown was anticipated between these males and the Kruger male. Then, the Kruger male was able to easily intimidate the nomads from a giraffe kill. This shows that the males are not quite ‘ready’ but their confrontations with the Kruger male, and with others, are certainly not over. The two males were seen resting in the Tjellahanga River, fit and healthy. We have not seen them for some time and they are looking very impressive indeed.


January 2013

NOMADIC MALES
(0 sighting)

These nomads were not seen during the period. Reports would suggest that they have been spending time in the western Sabi Sands.


December 2012

NOMADIC
(1 sighting)

Only the one sighting of these lions during the period but it proved to be a very notable one! In previous reports were have suggested that it is time for these males to make their marks or else it would be unlikely that they are ever to become dominant over a pride. Well it seems that making a mark has been exactly what they have decided to do. One morning we followed tracks of three male lions in southern Charleston around Jakkalsdraai Open Area. After some hard work we found the lions. These two nomadic lions were resting and unbeknown to them, a Manyelethi male had been trailing after them and was watching them from a distance. It was the Manyelethi male with the scarred hip who had taken it upon himself to track down these intruders and warn them off. The male from the Marthly pride was the first to notice the Manyelethi male. Both of the nomads took off, with the Manyelethi male chasing the Eyrefield male with great purpose. We lost the lions as they made way through some dense bush. Ten minutes later we found the trio again. The Manyelethi male must have been satisfied he had chased the males far enough and when he reached the Tjellahanga River, he turned and began to saunter casually back north. Meanwhile the Marthly male had decided he was not going to be dominated and he followed the Manyelethi male from behind, roaring aggressively as he went. This was a dramatic tactic from the nomadic lion and it is a sure sign that he is growing in confidence. This is certainly not going to be last encounter between the nomads and the Manyelethi males. The dominant foursome is not by the slightest under threat from these two up-and-coming males, but the brothers could be potentially vulnerable if they are caught alone and without any brother as company. The male from the Marthly pride is similarly aged to the Manyelethi males and is a large lion. He could definitely induce some damage if he could fight one on one.


November 2012

NOMADIC
(3 sightings)

These nomadic males were seen on three occasions this month, all in the southern reaches of the property. They are in good condition which is good news, and both look fully fit which has not always been the case. The male from the Marthly pride looks as magnificent as ever and is surely in his prime by now. The chances of these males ever becoming dominant over a pride do not look promising and they may have to disperse to new areas should they ever wish to do so.          


September & October 2012

SUB ADULT MALES FROM THE EYREFIELD PRIDE = 2
1 MALE 5 YEARS 3 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 7 YEARS 3 MONTHS
NOMADIC
(September: 0 sightings)
(October: 2 sightings)

Just two sightings of these males in the month of October. They were both extremely well fed and had been attracted to the area by a large herd of buffalo. They msut have had success in catching one and we found them near the Windmill where they hardly moved for two days. These two males have been spending time in the south along with many other male lions that are new to the area. The male from the Marthly pride is now in his prime and sports a tremendous mane, quite different to the male from the Eyrefield pride that still has some way to go in that department. Both lions are fit and the Marthly male seems to have shrugged off the limp he had in July and August.


August 2012

SUB ADULT MALES FROM THE EYREFIELD PRIDE = 2
1 MALE 5 YEARS 1 MONTH
MARTHLY MALE 7 YEARS 1 MONTH
NOMADIC

(4 sightings)

The movements of these two males was similar to what we have seen over the past few months. They have been spending most of their time following a large herd of buffalo throughout Charleston. The male from the Marthly Pride has had difficulty hunting since he has had a limp. This has no doubt limited their hunting success and we are not certain that they managed to kill any buffalo this month. There are some interesting lion politics at play in southern Charleston. One of the KNP male lions is missing, and these two boys have been spending more time in that area, even roaring on occasion! Who knows how things might unfold. Is it a possibility that this duo could compete against the remaining KNP male and take- over the Charleston and Selati Prides?


July 2012

SUB ADULT MALES FROM THE EYREFIELD PRIDE = 2
1 MALE
MARTHLY MALE
NOMADIC

(3 sightings)

These two nomadic young males continue to wander around the southern parts of MalaMala. This month saw them have a brief reunion with three members of their former pride. It’s been over a year since we’ve seen these animals together. We found the males on the eastern bank of the Sand River, north of Beaumont’s hippo pools, where they were staring intently southwards at something in the reeds. A sudden burst of legs and necks revealed several giraffe running eastwards, with three lionesses in hot pursuit. After a brief chase, the lionesses realised they didn’t stand a chance with their taller-than-usual prey, and lost interest. At this point we had not identified the three lionesses that the two males we looking at with such curiosity. The lionesses advanced, and the males didn’t move. This continued for over an hour and into the early hours of the evening as darkness fell. Always submissive as they continued moving closer, it became clear that the lionesses were none other than the three young Eyrefield lionesses – the sisters and cousins of the younger of the two males. When the two lions were a mere five metres apart, the male from the Marthly pride stood up and advanced towards them. The sheer size of him and his unfamiliarity due to a few years’ of absence, caused the one lioness to lose her nerve, and she retreated. As with any animal, especially males trying to be dominant, when ground is given, ground must be taken. The lionesses increased their speed to a jog and so did the males, who by this stage were approaching River road and still looking to go northwards. Male lions generally tire more easily than females, and the two young brutes soon lost interest just to the north of Charleston North. The the lionesses continued northwards along river road, and the males stood catching their breath after the mere few hundred-metre jog!


June 2012

1 MALE 4 YEARS 11 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 10 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 11 MONTHS

NOMADIC (0 sightings)

All four sightings this month were of the Marthly male and only one Eyrefield male. Both males are in good shape especially the Marthly male who is really coming into his own as a large male. The other Eyrefield male has been unwell for a very long time and whenever he had been absent in the past everyone would assume that he had breathed his last breath. The will to live is innate in the animal kingdom and lions are particularly resilient. He has bounced back in the past, although this is probably the longest recorded period of his absence from his two comrades.


May 2012

1 MALE 4 YEARS 10 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 9 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 10 MONTHS

NOMADIC (0 sightings)

There were no sightings during the report period but reports of the male with half a tail suggest that he has died. We will elaborate once we have confirmation of this.


April 2012

1 MALE 4 YEARS 9 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 8 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 9 MONTHS

NOMADIC (0 sightings)

There were no sightings during the report period.


March 2012

1 MALE 4 YEARS 9 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 8 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 9 MONTHS

NOMADIC (2 sightings)

These three nomadic males continue to roam around Charleston. The four Selati males moving further west with their territorial pursuits is good news for these three males and they can now go about their business without having to constantly be looking over their shoulders. Well, at least that’s the case for the time being. This news will be most welcomed by the ailing young Eyrefield male who is still fighting for his life. He has already survived much longer than we thought he would making it clear that he is not intent on going gently into that good night.


February 2012

1 MALE 4 YEARS 8 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 7 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 8 MONTHS

NOMADIC (1 sighting)

Only the one sighting of these males this month and it was at Ridge Rocks in the most south eastern corner of Charleston. The one young  Eyrefield male is still in poor shape but he continues to march on to everyone’s amazement. The Marthly male on the other hand is in prime condition, a more beautiful lion you will not see.


January 2012

1 MALE 4 YEARS 7 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 6 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 7 MONTHS

NOMADIC (1 sighting)

Only two of the sub-adult males from the Eyrefield pride were seen this month, and they were in the company was the single Marthly male when we found them. They were all located on Western Charleston around the shortcut between first and second turning Jakkalsdraai.


December 2011

1 MALE 4 YEARS 6 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 5 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 6 MONTHS

NOMADIC (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of these males during the month.


November 2011

1 MALE 4 YEARS 5 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 4 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 5 MONTHS

NOMADIC (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of these males during the month.


October 2011

1 MALE 4 YEARS 4 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 3 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 4 MONTHS

NOMADIC (1 sighting)

There was a single sighting of one of the young nomadic males around the Charleston Flockfield boundary, but he was swiftly chased off his hard-earned buffalo kill by two of the Manyelethi males.


September 2011

1 MALE 4 YEARS 3 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 2 MONTHS
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 3 MONTHS

NOMADIC (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of these males during the month.


August 2011

SUB-ADULT MALES FROM THE EYREFIELD PRIDE = 3

1 MALE 4 YEARS 2 MONTHS
1 MALE 4 YEARS 1 MONTH
MARTHLY MALE 6 YEARS 2 MONTHS

NOMADIC (2 sightings)

These three young males have been separated for about three months now, and are managing to survive just fine. The Marthly male has recovered from his wounds and is looking enormous, the healthy young Eyrefield male is also in great condition and looking very powerful. The male with the half tail is still skin and bones, but somehow is managing to stay alive. I'm sure the other two males are keeping him alive, although he seems to be able to keep up with them. If his condition doesn't improve though, we might have to consider that he has a disease that is attacking him. Hopefully this isn't the case and that the coalition continues to survive.


MalaMala Game Reserve, PO Box 55514, Northlands, 2116, South Africa.
Telephone: + 27 11 442 2267 or 0861 SAFARI.
Facsimile: + 27 11 442 2318
e-Mail: reservations@malamala.com;


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