OTHER LIONS ENCOUNTERED

September 2014

  • Two unidentified male lions (1 sighting)

Seen on the 8th at the junction of 1st Turning Jakkalsdraai and Charleston drive.

June 2014

  • Male lion from the Marthly Pride (0 sightings)                             8 YEARS 11 MONTHS

There were no sightings of this nomadic male during June. We believe that his days are numbered without the help of his companion, the Eyrefield Male, who was presumed dead a few months back.

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of this pride during June. We believe that they are spending most of their time to our west and are receiving pressure from the Marthly and Eyrefield Prides. Reports indicate that the nine cubs are in great shape and that the Manyelethi Males have been spending a lot of time with them.

  • Selati Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of the Selati Pride in June. Reports tell us that some of the lionesses have been mating with a coalition of three males in the south and that the Kruger Male has not been seen with the pride for some time now.

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these males during June.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (6 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen with the Fourways Pride all six occassions in June. One of the males looked to have sustained quite a bad injury in a giraffe hunt. We are unsure whether he will heal. Time will tell if he can get back to normal condition.

  • 3 adult male lions in Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these adult male lions in June.

  • 1 Male Lion seen with the Styx Pride (0 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on one occasion in November, but there were no confirmed sightings of him during June. He was seen mating with the Styx lionesses last year and we assume that the new Styx cubs have been sired by him

May 2014

  • Male lion from the Marthly Pride (0 sightings)                              8 YEARS 10 MONTHS

There were no sightings of this nomadic male during May. We believe that his days are numbered without the help of his companion, the Eyrefield Male, who was presumed dead a few months back.

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of this pride during May. We believe that they are spending most of their time to our west and are receiving pressure from the Marthly and Eyrefield Prides. Reports indicate that the nine cubs are in great shape and that the Manyelethi Males have been spending a lot of time with them.

  • Selati Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of the Selati Pride in May. Reports tell us that some of the lionesses have been mating with a coalition of three males in the south and that the Kruger Male has not been seen with the pride for some time now.

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these males during May.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (5 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen with the Fourways Pride all five occassions in May. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size. They could look to start mating with the older lioness in the future if she believes that they will be able to provide a safe space to raise the cubs.

  • 3 adult male lions in Charleston (1 sighting)

There was one sightings of these adult male lions in May. Two of them were seen in southern Flockfield in the early parts of the month.

  • 1 Male Lion seen with the Styx Pride (0 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on one occasion in November, but there were no confirmed sightings of him during May. He was seen mating with the Styx lionesses last year and we assume that the new Styx cubs have been sired by him. He was seen by our northern neighbours this month. He came in from the east and was not seen with the Styx Pride.

  • A pride of 9 lions seen in Flockfield during winter 2013. (6 sightings)

This pride was seen six times in May. We believe them to be a pride our southern neighbours call the Eastern Bank Pride. The pride consists of 3 lionesses with one sub-adult female and 5 sub-adult males that seem to be around 2-2 ½ years old. They were seen with a young giraffe kill on Matshapiri Dam Road on the 17th. They spend most of their time in the eastern parts of the property and were viewed on northern side Kapen, Buffalo Bush Dam and Paddy’s Pools throughout the month. Because of their recent regular appearences on the property they will be re-named next month and given a new column to be represented as a regular pride on MalaMala. We look forward to their antics in the future.

 

April 2014

  • Male lion from the Marthly Pride (0 sightings)                              8 YEARS 9 MONTHS

There were no sightings of this nomadic male during April. We believe that his days are numbered without the help of his companion, the Eyrefield Male, who was presumed dead last month. He was injured by the Marthly Breakaway lionesses at the beginning of the month when he tried to steal a kill from them.

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of this pride during April. We believe that they are spending most of their time to our west and are receiving pressure from the Marthly and Eyrefield Prides. Reports indicate that the nine cubs are in great shape and that the Manyelethi Males have been spending a lot of time with them.

  • Selati Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of the Selati Pride in April. We have heard from our neighbours to the south of a lionesses giving birth to new cubs at the beginning of the year. Their movements are fairly erratic and the pride has apparently split with six lionesses moving very far south-east from the rest of the pride. The single Kruger Male lion still seems to have dominace over a portion of this pride but he is receiving tough competition from two other coalitions, time will tell whether he is able to maintain his reign over this pride.

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these males during April.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (5 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen with the Fourways Pride all five occassions in April. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size. They could look to start mating with the older lioness in the future if she believes that they will be able to provide a safe space to raise the cubs.

  • 3 adult male lions in Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these adult male lions in April. We believe that they spend most of their time in the south-western parts of the Sabi Sands and are competing with the Kruger Male for dominace over the Selati Pride.

  • 1 Male Lion seen with the Styx Pride (0 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on one occasion in November, but there were no confirmed sightings of him during March. He was seen mating with the Styx lionesses last year and we assume that the new Styx cubs have been sired by him.

  • A pride of 9 lions seen in Flockfield during winter 2013. (2 sighting)

This pride was seen twice in April. We believe them to be a pride our southern neighbours call the Eastern Bank Pride. The pride consists of 2 lionesses with one sub-adult female and 6 sub-adult males that seem to be around 2-2 ½ years old. They were seen in eastern Flockfield on the 15th and then the following day rangers tracked and found them on Martial Loop. They could be looking to take advantage of the vast space on the property where there has been litle lion activity this year.

 

March 2014

  • Male lion from the Marthly Pride (5 sightings)                              8 YEARS 8 MONTHS

There were five confirmed sightings of this nomadic male in March. It seems that he has lost his companion (the Eyrefield Male) and is left to fend on his own. He was seen in the company of the Charleston and Fourways Prides. On the second occasion he was feeding off a buffalo carcass near the Pride. He is in weak condition and we doubt that he will last much longer without the help of the Eyrefield Male. Reports indicate that he also had a run-in with the lionesses from the Marthly-Breakaway Pride late in the month.

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of this pride during March. We believe that they are spending most of their time to our west and are receiving pressure from the Marthly and Eyrefield Prides. Reports indicate that the nine cubs are in great shape and that the Manyelethi Males have been spending a lot of time with them.

  • Selati Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of the Selati Pride in March. We have heard from our neighbours to the south of a lionesses giving birth to new cubs at the beginning of the year. Their movements are fairly erratic and the pride has apparently split with six lionesses moving very far south-east from the rest of the pride. The single Kruger Male lion still seems to have dominace over a portion of this pride but he is receiving tough competition from two other coalitions, time will tell whether he is able to maintain his reign over this pride.

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these males during March.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (2 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen with the Fourways Pride on both occassions in March. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size. They red off a buffalo carcass close to Ostrich Koppies midway through the month.

  • 3 adult male lions in Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these adult male lions in March. We believe that they spend most of their time in the south-western parts of the Sabi Sands and are competing with the Kruger Male for dominace over the Selati Pride.

  • 1 Male Lion seen with the Styx Pride (0 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on one occasion in November, but there were no confirmed sightings of him during March. He was seen mating with the Styx lionesses last year and we assume that the new Styx cubs have been sired by him.

  • A pride of 9 lions seen in Flockfield during winter 2013. (5 sighting)

This pride was seen five times in March. We believe them to be a pride our southern neighbours call the Eastern Bank Pride. The pride consists of 2 lionesses with one sub-adult female and 6 sub-adult males that seem to be around 2-2 ½ years old. They were found initially in Charleston and then were seen as far north as Donalds crossing. Towards the end of the month we found them hunting buffalo around the Tamboti Thickets. There has been little lion action in the central parts of the property and it seems that this pride is exploiting the uninhabited area. The lionesses are relatively small and the young males have very little manes for their size.

 

February 2014

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of this pride during February. We believe that they are spending most of their time to our west and are receiving pressure from the Marthly and Eyrefield Prides. Reports indicate that the nine cubs are in great shape and that the Manyelethi Males have been spending a lot of time with them.

  • Selati Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of the Selati Pride in February. We have heard from our neighbours to the south of a lionesses giving birth to new cubs last month. Their movements are fairly erratic and the pride has apparently split with six lionesses moving very far south-east from the rest of the pride. The single Kruger Male lion still seems to have dominace over a portion of this pride but he is receiving tough competition from two other coalitions, time will tell whether he is able to maintain his reign over this pride.

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these males during February.

  • 9 sub-adult lions seen in Flockfield during February 2014. (1 sighting)

 
There was a pride of 9 sub-adult lions seen on Flockfield during February. These might have been  juviniles from the Selati Pride but we cannot confirm. They were seen at night and so little was known about the compisition of the lions. The Selati Pride was experiencing a split and this could have chased the sub-adults north onto our property.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (9 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen with the Fourways Pride on nine occassions in February. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size. All nine sightings of them was in the company of the Fourways Pride and it seems that the pride has adopted them as their own. They fed off an elephant carcass on Nyathi Rd for four days in the company of the Fourways Pride.

  • 3 adult male lions in Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these adult male lions in February. We believe that they spend most of their time in the south-western parts of the Sabi Sands and are competing with the Kruger Male for dominace over the Selati Pride.

  • 1 Male Lion seen with the Styx Pride (0 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on one occasion in November, but there were no confirmed sightings of him during February. He was seen mating with the Styx lionesses last year and we assume that the new Styx cubs have been sired by him.

  • A pride of 9 lions seen in Flockfield during winter 2013. (1 sighting)

This pride was seen again in February in Flockfield. We believe them to be a pride our southern neighbours call the Eastern Bank Pride. The pride consists of 2 lionesses with one sub-adult female and 6 sub-adult males that seem to be around 2-2 ½ years old. We will see if they decide to spend more time on MalaMala.

 

January 2014

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of this pride during January. We believe that they are spending most of their time to our west and are putting pressure on the Eyrefield Pride, forcing them east onto MalaMala. Reports indicate that the nine cubs are in great shape.

  • Selati Pride (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of the Selati Pride in January. We have heard from our neighbours to the south of lionesses giving birth to new cubs and this, already large, pride is further increasing in numbers. Their movements are fairly erratic and the pride is split for most of their time, reports indicate. The single Kruger Male lion still seems to have dominace over this pride but he is receiving tough competition from two other coalitions, time will tell whether he is able to maintain his reign over this pride.

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these males during January.

  • 4 unidentified young males seen inconsistently so far in 2013. (0 sighting)

 
These same lions did not appear on MalaMala in January. They were last seen in July.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (3 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen with the Fourways Pride on three occassions in January. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size. All three sightings of them was in the company of the Fourways Pride and it seems that the pride has adopted them as their own.

  • 3 adult male lions in Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these adult male lions in January. We believe that they spend most of their time in the south-western parts of the Sabi Sands and are competing with the Kruger Male for dominace over the Selati Pride.

  • 1 Male Lion seen with the Styx Pride (0 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on one occasion in November, but there were no confirmed sightings of him during January. He was seen mating with the Styx lionesses last year and we assume that the new Styx cubs have been sired by him.

  • A pride of 7 lions seen in December 2013. (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of this pride in January. We think that they are spending most of their time south and east of our boarders.

 

December 2013

  • Kruger male lion:

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON
DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE                 
(0 sightings)

There were no recorded sightings of the single Kruger Male lion. Reports indicate he is competing with the young males from the Eyrefield and Marthly Prides for dominance over the Selati Pride. Reports also state that the Kruger Male is dominant over the younger Eyrefield Male but the older Marthly Male is dominant over the Kruger Male. There is another coalition of three male lions who were seen on MalaMala once last month. One of these males were seen mating with a Selati Lioness’s in Peru which means they are a threat to the Kruger Male Lion.

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (14 lions) (1 sighting)

There was one confirmed sighting of this pride during December. They were seen around Small-Paraffin Drift in Marthly. This large pride is growing to dominate a large proportion of the Sabi Sands. The four lionesses are very strong and are a direct threat to the Marthly Pride as well as the Eyrefield pride and could look to force the latter to spend more time east of the Sand River in the future.

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no sightings of these males during December.

  • 4 unidentified young males seen inconsistently so far in 2013. (0 sighting)

 
These same lions did not appear on MalaMala in December. They were last seen in July.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (3 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen on three occassions in December. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size. All three sightings of them was in the company of the Fourways Pride and it seems that the pride has adopted them as their own

  • 3 adult male lions in Charleston (1 sighting)

There was one sighting of the three adult males during December. They were seen on Campbell Rd in South West Charleston toward the end of the month. We assume that they are competing with a number of male lions for dominace in the southern reaches of the Sabi Sands.

  • 1 Male Lion seen with the Styx Pride (0 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on one occasion in November, but no confirmed sightings of him during December although there was a male lion seen at Clarendon Dam. Reports suggest that this male lion has been mating with the two Styx pride Lionesses and spends time with them when they are in Gowrie.

  • 2 Fully-Maned Male Lions from Gowrie (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of these two male lions during December. These two males were seen once near Clarendon Dam Road. Reports from Gowrie indicate these two males have also mated with the two Styx Lionesses in recent times.

  • A pride of 7 lions seen in December 2013. (2 sightings)

There were two sightings of this unidentified pride during December. They were found once in Flockfield and again in Charleston. On the second occasion the two lionesses were found feeding off a warthog carcass and were separated from the sub-adults. Research indicates that this pride is generally found East of the Sand River in Toulon and most probably came in from the Kruger National Park. One of the sub-adult males is quite uneasy around the vehicles. Some speculate that they could be some of the descendants of the legendary Windmill Pride that patrolled Mala Mala a decade ago. We wait to see if they will still venture onto Mala Mala and wether they will be seen on a regular occasion.

 

November 2013

  • Kruger male lion:

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON
DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE                 
(0 sightings)

There were no recorded sightings of the single Kruger Male lion. Reports indicate he is competing with the young males from the Eyrefield and Marthly Prides for dominance over the Selati Pride. Reports also state that the Kruger Male is dominant over the younger Eyrefield Male but the older Marthly Male is dominant over the Kruger Male. There is another coalition of three male lions who were seen on MalaMala once last month. One of these males were seen mating with a Selati Lioness’s in Peru which means they are a threat to the Kruger Male Lion.

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)

No sightings of these lions during November

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sightings)

There was no sign of the three sub adult males during November.

  • 4 unidentified young males seen inconsistently so far in 2013 (0 sighting)

 
These same lions did not appear on MalaMala in November. They were last seen in July.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (0 sightings)

These two young male lions were not seen in November. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size.

  • 3 adult male lions in Charleston (1 sighting)

There were one confirmed sighting of one of these three male lions. He was found at Trollips Hippo Pools. He is recognisable by his blonde mane and scarring around his right eye. The three males are young adult lions.

  • 1 Male Lion seen with the Styx Pride(1 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on one occasion in November. Reports suggest that this male lion has been mating with the two Styx pride Lionesses and spends time with them when they are in Gowrie.

  • 2 Fully-Maned Male Lions from Gowrie (0 sightings)

There were no sightings of these two male lions during November. These two males were seen once near Clarendon Dam Road. Reports from Gowrie indicate these two males have also mated with the two Styx Lionesses in recent times.

  • A pride of 10 lions seen in Flockfield November 2013 (1 sighting)

There was one sighting of a pride of ten lions which were found on rock drift road mid way through the month. The lions may have been members of the Selati pride but tracks indicated the lions had come from the Kruger National Park. Almost a year ago, rangers Grant Roodt and Nic Moxham walked into a pride of many lions in the Tjellahanga Tributary East. We suspect these may be the same lions they saw this time last year. Other rangers have speculated that this may be the return of the legendary Windmill Pride.

 

October 2013

  • Kruger male lion:

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON
DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE                 
(0 sightings)

There were no recorded sightings of the single Kruger Male lion. Reports indicate he is competing with the young males from the Eyrefield and Marthly Prides for dominance over the Selati Pride. Reports also state that the Kruger Male is dominant over the younger Eyrefield Male but the older Marthly Male is dominant over the Kruger Male. There is another coalition of three male lions who were seen on MalaMala once last month. One of these males were seen mating with a Selati Lioness’s in Peru which means they are a threat to the Kruger Male Lion.
  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)
No sightings of these lions during October
  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sightings)
There was no sign of the three sub adult males during October. These three young male lions were seen August. It is likely that these were three of the thirty two month male sub adults from the Selati Pride. Finding the lions in the north eastern parts of south western Charleston indicates they may have been chased by either the Eyrefield and Marthly male lions, the Kruger Male Lion, or the three adult male lions located on Flat Rocks a few weeks later.
  • 4 unidentified young males seen consistently so far in 2013. (0 sighting)

These same lions did not appear on MalaMala in October. They were last seen in July.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (3 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen together with the Fourways pride for all the three occasions in which the Fourways Pride were seen in October. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size. The male with the blonde mane mounted and attempted to mate with one of the lionesses from the Fourways Pride

  • 3 male lions in Charleston (0 sighting)

There were no confirmed sightings of any of these three male lions in October. Reports indicate one of these males was seen mating with a lioness from the Selati Pride for 5 days. These three male lions are adult lions.

  • 1 male lion seen with the Styx Pride (2 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on two occasions. Reports suggest that this male lion has been mating with the two Styx pride Lionesses and spends time with them when they are in Gowrie. He was chased northwards over the Gowrie Boundary by two members of a coalition of six male lions who come from the north when they found him with the two Styx Lionesses.

  • 2 Fully-Maned Male Lions from Gowrie (1 sighting)
These two males were seen once near Clarendon Dam Road. Reports from Gowrie indicate these two males have mated with the two Styx Lionesses in recent times. These two adult males chased the single male lion seen with the Styx Pride(mentioned above) away from the two Styx Lionesses the night after they were found.

 

September 2013

  • Kruger male lion:

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON
DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE                 
(0 sightings)

There were no recorded sightings of the single Kruger Male lion. Reports indicate he is competing with the young males from the Eyrefield and Marthly Prides for dominance over the Selati Pride. Reports also state that the Kruger Male is dominant over the younger Eyrefield Male but the older Marthly Male is dominant over the Kruger Male.

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (0 sightings)

No sightings of these lions during September

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (0 sightings)

There was no sign of the three sub adult males during September. It is likely that these were three of the thirty two month male sub adults from the Selati Pride. Finding the lions in the north eastern parts of south western Charleston indicates they may have been chased by either the Eyrefield and Marthly male lions, the Kruger Male Lion, or the three adult male lions located on Flat Rocks a few weeks later.

  • 4 unidentified young males seen consistently so far in 2013. (0 sighting)

These same lions did not appear on MalaMala in August.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (1 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen together with the Fourways pride on one occasion. The Fourways pride were only seen once during September. The larger of these two males has bigger mane and a large scar on his back. The younger has a very blonde mane and a mature looking face for his size.

  • 3 male lions in Charleston (1 sighting)

Three adult male lions were located in the Sand River near track West of Flat Rocks on two occasions. They are fully mature male lions.

  • 1 male lion seen with the Styx Pride(2 sighting)

One male lion between 5 and 7 years old was found with the Styx Pride on two occasions. Reports suggest that this male lion has been mating with the two Styx pride Lionesses and spends time with them when they are in Gowrie.

 

August 2013

  • Kruger male lion:

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON
DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE                 
(0 sightings)

There were no recorded sightings of the single Kruger Male lion. Reports indicate he is competing with the young males from the Eyrefield and Marthly Prides for dominance over the Selati Pride. Reports also state that the Kruger Male is dominant over the younger Eyrefield Male but the older Marthly Male is dominant over the Kruger Male.

  • The Break- Away Marthly Pride (5 sightings)

It was a pleasant surprise to find the full compliments of the Break-Away Marthly pride, four lionesses and nine cubs, in the Manyelethi River. This is the first time in years that the pride has been located on MalaMala property. All four Manyelethi Males were present which made a total of seventeen lions at one sighting.

  • 3 young male lions in South Western Charleston (3 sightings)

Three sub adult male lions were seen in South Western Charleston on three occasions during August. We assume they are members of the Selati Pride.

  • 4 unidentified young males seen consistently so far in 2013. (1 sighting)

 
These same lions appeared once on MalaMala property in August. They were found in the southern parts of Charleston.

  • 2 young male lions with Fourways Pride (2 sightings)

These two young male lions were seen together with the Fourways pride on one occasion. The Fourways pride were only seen once during August.

  • 3 male lions in Charleston (1 sighting)

Three adult male lions were located in the Sand River opposite Sibuye Drive.

 

July 2013

  • Kruger male lion:

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON
DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE                 
(0 sightings)

There were no recorded sightings of the single Kruger Male lion. Reports indicate he is competing with the young males from the Eyrefield and Marthly Prides for dominance over the Selati Pride. Reports also state that the Kruger Male is dominant over the younger Eyrefield Male but the older Marthly Male is dominant over the Kruger Male.

  • Two lionesses on the western bank of the Sand River in Charleston.

We assume these were members of the Selati pride as the Eyrefield pride were in the north.

  • 4 unidentified young males seen consistently so far in 2013. (3 sightings)

 
These same lions appeared three times on MalaMala property in July. In one sighting, all four young males were found at the Windmill. They chased zebra in the late morning hours. Other sightings consisted of only three pride members present.

We noticed one of the lions had a brand reading the number 5 on his right shoulder.

The windmill is the most north they have come indicating their awareness towards the four Manyelethi males.

  • 2 young male lion left and rejoined the Fourways Pride (2 sightings)

These young males were chased by the Manyelethi Males. One evening, they were located at Buffalo Bush Dam on their own, a week later we found the Fourways Pride with the two young males present.

There is no change with the male lion who has recently joined up with the Fourways pride. It seems he is suitable member for the pride. His size and strength can only be used to the prides advantage. He was seen with the Fourways Pride for all seven sightings.

 

June 2013

  • Kruger male lion: 0 sightings

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON. DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE

  • 1 lioness in the Manyelethi River

This lioness may have been a member of the Marthly pride. She was located on by herself with a strong smell of carrion in the area.

  • 4 unidentified young males and one elder female with a blind eye. (1 sighting)   

These lions were seen only once during June. They are the same lions who were found on our property for the first time in April. The sighting took place at the track that runs west from Flat Rocks.

  • 1 male lion chased the Styx Pride at Mlowathi open area

We are unsure who this large and fully maned lion could be.

  • 1 male lion who has joined the Fourways pride

There is no change with the male lion who has recently joined up with the Fourways pride. It seems he is suitable member for the pride. His size and strength can only be used to the prides advantage. He was seen with the Fourways pride for all seven sightings.

 

May 2013

  • Kruger male lion: 0 sightings

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON. DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE

There were no recorded sightings of the single Kruger male lion. Reports indicate he is competing with the young males from the Eyrefield and Marthly prides for dominance over the Selati Pride. Reports also state that the Kruger Male is dominant over the younger Eyrefield Male but the older Marthly male is dominant over the Kruger Male.

  • 4 unidentified young males and one elder female with a blind eye. (1 sighting)   

On the Second of May there were four young male lions and one lioness seen at Misters Koppies. We believe these lions are the same lions which were discovered in the Paradise Valley during April. April’s game report stated that the fourth young was no longer existant, however, this sighting proved that information wrong. The pride is known by other reserves as the Hilda’s Rock Pride or Skukuza pride. There were no other sightings of these lions in the remaining days of May. The young males have brands on their hind quarters which apparently relates to research conducted on the pride. The lioness accompanying the males has a blind eye.(Note, the information regarding the pride’s name and composition are to be confirmed)

  • 2 male lions seen on Dudley Lookout on the 7th of May

Visual of the lions was poor therefore no positive identification was made. The two lions could have been members of the Manyelethi male coalition. The lions may also have been the Eyrefield male and Marthly male. Their maturity rules out the chance of the lions being the two young males from the Charleston Pride or the young males from the Skukuza pride.

  • 1 male lion who has joined the Fourways pride

The Fourways pride has been joined by a young male. All three sightings of the pride included the new male’s presence. He is older than the other two existing males in the pride. We believe he is the young male who was recently kicked out of the Nkuhuma pride who’s territory resides in the Manyelethi area. It is not the first time the Fourways pride has adopted a young male but we cannot be sure if it is the same male they have adopted in the past.


April 2013

  • Kruger male lion: 0 sightings

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON. DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE

There were no recorded sightings of the single Kruger male lion. Reports indicate he is competing with the young males from the Eyrefield and Marthly prides for dominance over the Selati Pride. Reports also state that the Kruger Male is dominant over the younger Eyrefield Male but the older Marthly male is dominant over the Kruger Male.

  • 3 unidentified young males and one elder female with a blind eye

(3 sightings) These lions were found on Paradise Valley Road,  on the south eastern parts of the property. The tracks indicate they came from the south and east and we believe it is the first time they have been recorded on MalaMala Game Reserve. Research shows these lions are members of the Hilda’s Rock pride or also known as the Skukuza pride. It did not take long for the Manyelethi males to get wind of the prides movements and when rangers followed up on the pride the next morning, only one of the young males was found. He was at Zebra Skull South and two of the Manyelethi males were found  close to the single young male, at The Windmill. The Manyelethi males’ tracks showed they may have chased off the new pride separating one of the young males in the process. The separated young male lion was found again a day later still on his own.

This pride originally consisted of two adult females. The other female wears a radio collar around her neck and is currently split from the rest of the pride. The three young males were four until one was killed by 3 male lions from the Kruger National Park. (Note, the information regarding the pride’s name and composition are to be confirmed)

  • 3 unidentified male lions at pole in the road

(1 sighting) These male lions were briefly seen at Pole in the Road and have been identified as the three Sand River males. There were no other confirmed sightings of these lions.

  • 2 unidentified female lions on the firebreak of Gowrie Trust Road

(1 sighting) This was another brief visual. The lionesses may have been members of the Styx pride or Marthly pride.


March 2013

  • Kruger male lion: 0 sightings

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON. DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE

See ‘males from the Eyrefield pride’ and Selati pride’ for more information of this lion.

  • Two unidentified males:

(1 sightings). These two males were seen by field workers in Charleston. It could have been that they were the males from the Eyrefield and Marthly prides.


February 2013

  • Kruger male lion: 0 sightings

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON. DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE

No confirmed sightings during the period. There are two groups of male lions that are perhaps placing pressure on this male. They are the two nomads from the Eyrefield pride and a group of three that hail from the ‘Hilda’s Rock’ (Skukuza) pride. The three males are also known as the Sand River males. So far the Kruger male is holding his own and by is managing to fend off these males for the moment.

  • Unknown pride:

(2 sightings).This pride is nervous of vehicles and has been seen in the south. There are a number of females and young cubs but the exact composition is not known. They have come from the Kruger National Park where they must not have been viewed regularly. It is always great to see a new pride of lions. One wonders how often this group might have come to contact with vehicles or humans.

  • Old male lion:

(2 sightings). This old male had been trailing a herd of buffalo in the northeast. We have discovered that he is around nine years of age. He was first seen to our north in 2008 and he was with another male lion. These two lions were known as the Manyeleti males. There is no connection with the four Manyelethi males that are currently dominant on MalaMala.

A few years ago the pair had an encounter with the two Mlowathi (AKA ‘Mapogo’) males that were the incumbent males at the time. One of the two intruders sustained serious injury and he did not live for much longer. The remaining male, who has since been nicknamed ‘Joker’ in reference to a prominent gape in his right jaw, then travelled alone and was even seen mating with some lionesses in a pride known as the ‘Nkuhuma’ pride. He then vanished and has now returned to the area. He has few battle scars showing that he has been a nomad for most of his life.

  • Young male lion:

(2 sightings). This is a younger male approximately six or seven years old. He was first seen toward the beginning of the period lurking around the Fourways pride. The females from that pride did not tolerate his presence and was chased off. The old male lion (known as ‘Joker’) was incidentally also in the area but he did not interact with the young male or the Fourways pride. It is believed that this young male could possibly hail from the Windmill pride but this is still to be confirmed. We have long suspected that the Fourways pride is a breakaway once belonging to the Windmill pride. The dynamics of these lions are difficult to monitor since their movements take them east into the Kruger National Park. Read section on the Styx pride to see how this young male managed to chase that pride off a giraffe carcass.


January 2013

  • Kruger male lion: 3 sightings

SOUTHERN CHARLESTON, WESTERN CHARLESTON. DOMINANT OVER THE SELATI PRIDE

All three sightings of this good looking male were of him in the company of the Selati pride. He is somewhat of anomaly to the area in that he is a single male dominant over a single pride. It is more usual to have coalitions of males that are able to compete successfully for territory and become dominant over prides. The Kruger male’s brother died during 2012 and it will be interesting times ahead for this him. It would be wise to not stray too far from the many females in the Selati pride who should assist him should any takeover attempts be made.


November 2012

  • Two unidentified male lions: (1 sighting)

September & October 2012

  • Two unidentified male lions: (October: 2 sightings)

In the month of October, two unidentified male lions were seen on the very southern parts of the property. The tractor drivers found these males on consecutive days whislt repairing roads in that area. Unfortunately no rangers viewed these males and their identity will remain a mystery. We would like to assume that it was the young male from the Eyrefield pride and his companion from the Marthly pride, although we cannot be certain as there has been plenty of male lion activity in the southern Sabi Sands region with some new males visiting the area that have not been seen before. It could also be the same unidentified males that were reported to be seen with the Charleston pride.

  • Unidentified male lion: (September: 1 sighting)

A sub-adult male lion was briefly viewed on southwestern Charleston before he crossed our boundary. It is believed that this young male could belong to the Selati pride, a huge pride that was not seen in either September or October.

  • Unidentified male lion: (October: 1 sighting)

No picture was taken to establish an identity for this mature male lion seen on southwestern Charleston.

  • Unidentified male lion: (October: 1 sighting)

Seen in the southern most parts of the property and close to the Kruger National Park, we are still working on a confirmed identity for this male lion.

  • Unidentified pride: (September: 1 sighting)

Four lions were viewed on Flat Rocks. We are not sure of which pride they belong to but the Hilda’s Rock pride which is territorial around the Skukuza Airport.is a possibility.

There has been much movement among male lions in the south. Some males were reported to be spending time with the Charleston pride, while there were also three other males which had a run in with the Manyelethi males. These three males were lucky to escape from the Manyelethi males without serious injury. Some of the unidentified males could possibly belong to Hilda’s Rock pride. We will try to establish identities for these lions, still unknown at this stage.


August 2012

  • Kruger maile lions (3 sightings):

This coalition is dominant over the Charleston and Selati Prides. They were first seen on the property in August 2011. Recent sightings have been of one of the brothers which has been with the Selati Pride. News from our neighbours suggests that the other brother, who has had a limp for some time, is missing and has not been viewed for the past few months. If he has passed on, it is a possibility that the remaining male may prefer to spend his time with the Selati Pride and potentially abandon the Charleston Pride. We will monitor progress with the lions in the south with interest.

  • Unidentified male lion:

This young male was seen in the presence of the Fourways Pride. We are not sure of his history or where he has come from. For now, it looks like he may have joined the pride as a pride member and non- dominant male. He will need to be watchful of the Manyelethi males, although we have not seen any of the Manyelethi males in the company of this pride since the winter of 2011.

  • Obituary to the nomadic male lion from the Styx Pride:

Approaching five years of age, this male died in the early stages of this month. He had sustained a serious injury to his hind leg and was unable to hunt. The injury was believed to be caused in a failed attempt to hunt buffalo. This male was born in the same litter as the youngest adult lioness in the Styx Pride. Their mother is the eldest member of the pride, who also lost her youngest cub this month. He has been nomadic ever since the Manyelethi males have been in control of his native pride. Over the past year, we have had sporadic sightings of him around our northern boundary where he has been careful to avoid conflict with the Manyelethi males from the south, and another coalition of males further north. He had gained exceptional skills as a hunter and was famous for his ability to execute buffalo kills on his own. It is a sad death but the reality is that this lion had little chance of being able to ascertain a territory of his own and become dominant over a pride. It is a tall order for a single male attempting to establish dominance and their chances are slim.


July 2012

  • Kruger male lions (2 sightings):

These males are now the dominant males in the south and were seen on 2 occasions around the Track between the Camps on western Charleston.


May 2012

  • Young Styx Male (0 sightings)

  • Kruger males (0 sightings)

April 2012

  • Young Styx Male (1 sighting): This young male was seen from a distance near Clarendon dam and looks to be in good condition.

  • Kruger males (0 sightings)

  • Young No ID males (1 Sighting): Around the 13th of the month two young unidentified male lions were seen near Ostrich Koppies on a buffalo kill. They were not relaxed at first which could be an indication of them coming from outside of the Sabi Sands area.

March 2012

  • Young Styx Male (2 sightings)

On both occasions this young male was seen around Clarendon. The first sighting of him was early on in the month and it must’ve felt like Christmas for him as he’d stumbled upon a rhino carcass. This nomadic male is still some ways from being ready to challenge other males and win over lionesses so for the time being he’ll continue to maintain a low profile and fend for himself.

  • Kruger males (2 sightings)

Seen on only two occasions and in both instances they were in the company of the Selati and Charleston prides respectively.


February 2012

  • Young Styx Male (1 sightings)

  • Unidentified young male (1 sighting)


January 2012

  • Two Kruger National Park males (0 Sightings)

There were no sightings of these males during this month.

  • Selati males: (5 Sightings)
These buffalo hunting specialists yet again took down an impressive buffalo cow around the Sand River and Rock Drift Donga. They spent at least three days there polishing off the carcass. The Selati males did venture north again this month, and attracted the attention of the Manyelethi males around the Windmill. There was no evidence of the two prides interacting however.



December 2011

  • Two Kruger National Park males (2 Sightings)

Seen only twice during the report period. Once at Rocky crossing and then once in Jakkalsdraai open area. They probably ventured this far north to try and look for the Selati males.

  • Selati males: (6 Sightings)
These young brutes are seemingly enjoying the quieter territories of Charleston, making full use of this area of the reserve. They were seen in Ingwe donga and then as far north as Sable road. Not many dominant male lions make their way into this area so it is a haven for young males. They made good use of the buffalo population in this area, killing at least two, a large female and a calf.



November 2011

  • Styx Male: (1 Sighting)

A return! We saw this young male only once during the report period. He was in the northern reaches of the Matshipiri River when we found him, and from the outset appeared to be very anxious. Calling softly, he kept his nose to the ground as he followed the scent trail of other lions. He eventually ran into the Fourways pride, but they did not take kindly to his presence. The lionesses gave him a few cuffs with their paws and some aggressive bites to the back of his neck. This did not perturb him in the slightest though, as he proceeded to follow the pride for the rest of the morning. This was the only sighting of this youngster for the month.

  • Unidentified pride: (1 Sighting)

Charleston produces once again. This area of the reserve often has new lions coming through. This pride consisted of two lionesses, one of which had a collar on, and four young males. They were on the tracks of a herd of buffalo but were not seen to get within range of the herd. All the lions within the pride were very relaxed in the presence of the Land Rovers.

  • Selati males: (4 Sightings)
These young males seem to have made Charleston their home. The presence of a large herd of buffalo and very little competition from older males in this area has certainly had an influence on their movements during the month. We had a great sighting of them catching a buffalo bull.



October 2011

  • Unidentified Male lion: (1 Sighting)

A large unidentified male lion was seen chasing the young Styx male off his buffalo kill near Clarendon Dam. He stuck around for a few days until the carcass was finished, before heading back north.

  • Young Styx Male lion: (1 Sighting)
This young male is in fair condition in spite of having lost some of his mane and acquiring a few new scars on his face. This is a good indication that he’s standing his ground with the older males. One can only hope for the best for this young male in the upcoming months.



September 2011

Two Unidentified males ( 1 sighting)

On the last day of the report period these two males - approximately five years of age - were found on Matshipiri Dam road. Where they came from, or where they subsequently went, we have no idea. Both of them were in beautiful condition, with big bodies, but undeveloped manes. One wonders if these two males could be the catalyst for the downfall of the Manyelethi coalition?


August 2011

Two Kruger males ( 3 sightings)

These are the two news males that have taken over the Charleston pride. We saw them for the very first time at the beginning of the month. The two males are prime adults with thick, fully developed black manes. The bigger male has a badly injured left leg that he can't use at all, but aside from that he seems to be in great condition. He was feeding with the Charleston pride on the buffalo kill, so at least food isn't a problem for him. The second male is slightly smaller, but equally relaxed. He has nothing wrong with him, and is quite clearly in the prime of his life. These two males were first found close to the Charleston Flockfield boundary, which is way out of their normal territory. Perhaps they are looking to expand. Let's hope so.


MalaMala Game Reserve, PO Box 55514, Northlands, 2116, South Africa.
Telephone: + 27 11 442 2267 or 0861 SAFARI.
Facsimile: + 27 11 442 2318
e-Mail: reservations@malamala.com;


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